Thou Shalt Not Un-blog (Or Something Similarly Snappy, Or Snappy At All)

I’m new to the game, and my readership isn’t such that I have to take these questions too, too seriously, but Publius tackles them anyway

Anyway, the question is this — how long should writers have to edit or even remove posts without notifying readers?  My general view is that I have about a 10 minute window to remove a post entirely for any reason.  After that, I start feeling queasy about it — and, to my knowledge, I’ve never removed one after about 10-15 minutes (much as I’ve wanted to).

I think the window is longer for wordsmithing.  But after a half hour or so, I tend to think strikeouts or “Updates” are more appropriate unless they’re very minor typos.  Why that is, I’m not entirely sure.

I’ve only been blogging for a month or so, but I’ve felt pretty stupid about some of the things I’ve said.  Today, for example, it’s been damned hot and I haven’t said anything of merit.

I don’t think I’ve deleted anything outright, but I have gone back and done some wordsmithing (this post comes to mind) well after the fact.  All I did to alert my readers was mention that it was updated in the title; I didn’t tell anyone what I’d specifically changed.  In my defense, the changes were strictly stylistic, and nothing of substance was affected, but it still left me feeling a bit, shall we say, naughty.

Anyway, I think that I’m morally in the clear.  If I were an Yglesias, though, or a Sullivan, or a Publius–in short, if I were someone who the general public stumbled upon by accident, I might have to figure out a system.  But I’m not, so for the time being I feel pretty okay just winging it.

Advertisements

One response to “Thou Shalt Not Un-blog (Or Something Similarly Snappy, Or Snappy At All)

  1. I tweak (mostly because I can’t be bothered to properly proof read before hitting the publish button), but if there’s a substantive point changed I’ll note it as an update. I’ve never taken a post down. Probably because I don’t imagine that anyone cares.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s